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Friday, March 16

  1. page Headlands and Bays edited ... {Porthcurno_Bay_and_Logan_Rock_Headland.jpg} Porthocurno Bay and Logan Rock Headland WHAT ARE…
    ...
    {Porthcurno_Bay_and_Logan_Rock_Headland.jpg} Porthocurno Bay and Logan Rock Headland
    WHAT ARE HEADLANDS AND BAYS?
    ...
    lands forms big gay that occur
    {headlands1.gif} {headlands3.gif}
    ...
    forming headlands. TheThe gaps in
    The waves are slowed down by the headlands and the water in the bays is usually much calmer and slower. This means that the waves have less energy and therefore deposit their load of sand at the end of the bay, forming beaches. Depending on the size of the areas of weaker and harder rock, bays can be a few metres or many kilometers across.
    There are many different types of headlands. A long, very narrow headland is often called a promontory. Promontories are often famous for their rugged beauty, as they provide a clear view of the ocean and a sense of being alone, since the small mass of land does not permit many people. Extremely large headlands will be known as peninsulas, while capes are headlands which are placed in a position which interrupts the general currents of the ocean.
    (view changes)

Monday, October 30

  1. page Wave formation, fetch, constructive and destructive waves edited ... Bigger swash Smaller, less energy {http://www.geography.learnontheinternet.co.uk/images/coa…
    ...
    Bigger swash
    Smaller, less energy
    {http://www.geography.learnontheinternet.co.uk/images/coast/constructivewaves.gif}
    2. Destructive Waves.
    Smaller swash
    Bigger, much more energy than the Constructive wave
    {destructivewaves.gif}
    (view changes)

Sunday, November 28

Monday, February 15

Thursday, February 11

  1. page Sea Caves, Arches, Stacks and stumps edited Sea Caves, Arches, Stacks and Stumps Formation of.............. Sea Caves: Sea caves are form…

    Sea Caves, Arches, Stacks and Stumps
    Formation of..............
    Sea Caves:
    Sea caves are formed when a headland is worn away from the sides and ware away until there is a dent which is a sea cave.
    Formation of:

    Sea Caves
    {http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/269/Seacave_fault.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif} http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/269/Seacave_fault.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif Sea cave formation along a fault(Typically sea caves are formed using a weakness in the rocks, like faults, other sediments or weaker layers. Faults in the rock sometimes produce chains of caves; everywhere the fault reaches the seashore.)
    {http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/241/Seacave_dike.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif} http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/241/Seacave_dike.jpg?format=jpg,png,gifSea cave formation along a dike (
    A dike or dyke in geology is a type of sheet intrusion referring to any geologic body that cuts discordantly across
    planar wall rock structures, such as bedding or foliation
    massive rock formations, like igneous/magmatic intrusions and salt diapirs.
    Dikes can therefore be either intrusive or sedimentary in origin.)
    http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/241/Seacave_dike.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif
    {http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/153/Littoral_sinkhole.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif} http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/153/Littoral_sinkhole.jpg?format=jpg,png,gifSea cave collapse
    {http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/172/Belvedere_della_Grotta_di_Nereo.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif} http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/172/Belvedere_della_Grotta_di_Nereo.jpg?format=jpg,png,gifThe "belvedere" watching place in the north Sardinia Nereo Cave(The Nereo Cave is a huge underwater sea-cave situated on the north-west of Sardinia in the Coral riviera of Alghero, Italy.)http://pic.srv104.wapedia.mobi/thumb/21f014552/en/fixed/230/172/Belvedere_della_Grotta_di_Nereo.jpg?format=jpg,png,gif
    Arches
    {http://cache.marriott.com/propertyimages/b/bohbm/phototour/bohbm_phototour24.jpg} http://cache.marriott.com/propertyimages/b/bohbm/phototour/bohbm_phototour24.jpg
    Sea arches are formed when hydraulic action and corrosion erode along lines of weakness (e.g. joints, faults and bedding planes). Two back-to-back caves first form a sea arch..
    Stacks
    {http://farm1.static.flickr.com/140/319733495_554b284985.jpg} http://farm1.static.flickr.com/140/319733495_554b284985.jpg
    A stack is a geological landform consisting of a steep and often vertical column or columns of rock in the sea near a coast. Stacks are formed when part of a headland is eroded by hydraulic action, which is the force of the sea or water crashing against the rock. The force of the water weakens cracks in the headland, causing them to later collapse, forming free-standing stacks and even a small island. Stacks can provide important nesting locations forseabirds, and many are popular for rock climbing. The stacks will continue to be weathered and eroded untill it is very low and becomes a stack tk
    {http://www.maine.gov/doc/nrimc/mgs/explore/marine/sites/mar02-4.gif} http://www.maine.gov/doc/nrimc/mgs/explore/marine/sites/mar02-4.gif
    {http://www.rgs.edu.sg/events/geotrip/images/waveanim.gif} http://www.rgs.edu.sg/events/geotrip/images/waveanim.gifWhen the arch collapses, the sea ward pillar is left standing and becomes a stack. Continual wave erosion eventually reduces the stack into a stump.
    Headlands
    http://www.ukfossils.co.uk/guides/Caves-Arches-Stacks-Stumps.htm
    Sources:
    Websites-
    http://www.geographyalltheway.com/igcse_geography/natural_environments/marine_processes/coastal_landforms.htm, [[http://www.rgs.edu.sg/events/geotrip/stack.html ]], [[http://www.goodearthgraphics.com/virtcave/seacaves/seacaves.html ]]
    Video-
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLn-ajvLbrs

    (view changes)

Tuesday, November 10

  1. page Wave formation, fetch, constructive and destructive waves edited Wave formation, fetch, constructive and destructive waves Wave Formation {wave_formation_diag…

    Wave formation, fetch, constructive and destructive waves
    Wave Formation
    {wave_formation_diagram.gif}
    How are theywaves created?
    **

    Waves are created due to
    the transfer
    ...
    the sea (howeverinto the water, this does not always countinclude tsunamis however, those are an execption)
    This tells us...the larger
    formed due ton the wave=the more energy it has.
    ======How do they form?**======
    you need
    **======-wind speed& length of time the wind blows======
    -fetch(definition below)
    **======Basically, you need energy.======
    Waves
    underwater plate movement. Waves are formed
    ...
    open water.
    From
    Waves are formed from the photo you can seetop, that is where the wind hits the waves. Some waves are from fromin the top(by wind).
    As
    oceans can travel thousands of miles before reaching land. As the friction slowly increase,increases, the wave's base slows downdown, this interferes
    ...
    orbit and itthe wave becomes more egg shaped.
    With
    With more frictionfriction, the orbit
    ...
    the wave breaks.
    Whats
    breacks. The stronger the Fetch?**
    its
    wind, the distancebigger the wave. This means that the bigger the wave, the more energy is stored in it. This is called the fetch of the wave.
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/19/Boelge_stor.jpg}
    What is the Fetch?
    Fetch, often called the fetch length, is a term for the length of water over which a given
    wind blows (over open water)
    it also
    has blown. This determines the size of the waves
    longer
    and the fetch length&ammount of energy stored in a wave. The longer the Fetch lenght and the faster the wind speed=largerwind, the larger and stronger
    ...
    wave will bebe.
    What are the types of waves?

    There are 2Different Typestwo types of Waves:**
    1.Constructive Waves
    limited
    waves:
    Contructive Waves.
    Bigger swash
    Smaller, less
    energy
    most of these are used by

    {http://www.geography.learnontheinternet.co.uk/images/coast/constructivewaves.gif}
    2. Destructive Waves.
    Smaller
    swash to transport materials up the beach
    {constructive.jpg}
    2.Destructive Waves
    much

    Bigger, much
    more energy
    most of these are used by
    than the backwash to transport material back down the beachConstructive wave
    {destructivewaves.gif}
    (view changes)
    10:52 am

Monday, November 9

  1. page Spit, Tombolos and Salt Marsh edited wassup ? Spits, Tombolos and Salt Marshes Spits {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thu…
    wassup ?
    Spits, Tombolos and Salt Marshes
    Spits
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/13/Spit_diagram.svg/200px-Spit_diagram.svg.png} SpitA spit or sandspit is a deposition landform found off coasts. At one end, spits connect to land, while at the far end they exist in open water. A spit is a type of bar or beach that develops where a re-entrant occurs, such as at cove's headlands, by the process of longshore drift. Longshore drift (also called littoral drift) occurs due to waves meeting the beach at an oblique angle, and backwashing perpendicular to the shore, moving sediment down the beach in a zigzag pattern. Longshore drifting is complemented by longshore currents, which transport sediment through the water alongside the beach. These currents are set in motion by the same oblique angle of entering waves that causes littoral drift and transport sediment in a similar process.
    Tombolo
    A tombolo (Italian, from Latin tumulus – mound) or sometimes ayre (Old Norse Eyrr – gravel beach) is a
    Salt Marsh
    A salt marsh (also known as saltings) is a type of marsh that is a transitional intertidal between land and salty or brackish water (e.g.: sloughs, bays, estuaries). It is dominated by halophytic (salt tolerant) herbaceous plants. Historically, salt marshes have sometimes been treated as "wastelands", along with other wetlands. Salt marshes are one of the most biologically productive habitats on the planet, rivaling tropical rainforests. The daily tidal surges bring in nutrients, which tends to settle in roots of the plants within the salt marsh. The natural chemical activity of salty (or brackish) water and the tendency of algae to bloom in the shallow unshaded water also allow for great biodiversity.
    (view changes)

Sunday, November 8

  1. page Headlands and Bays edited ... {Porthcurno_Bay_and_Logan_Rock_Headland.jpg} Porthocurno Bay and Logan Rock Headland WHAT ARE…
    ...
    {Porthcurno_Bay_and_Logan_Rock_Headland.jpg} Porthocurno Bay and Logan Rock Headland
    WHAT ARE HEADLANDS AND BAYS?
    ...
    at the shore.coast.
    {headlands1.gif} {headlands3.gif}
    The waves are constantly eroding the coast through abrasion, corrasion, corrosion and hydraulic action, forcing the coast to recede. The weaker rock erodes much faster, so it recedes more and the slabs of harder rock are left jutting out, forming headlands. The gaps in between the headlands, which are surrounded by land on three sides, are called bays.
    ...
    load of sadsand at the
    There are many different types of headlands. A long, very narrow headland is often called a promontory. Promontories are often famous for their rugged beauty, as they provide a clear view of the ocean and a sense of being alone, since the small mass of land does not permit many people. Extremely large headlands will be known as peninsulas, while capes are headlands which are placed in a position which interrupts the general currents of the ocean.
    Examples of famous bays are:
    (view changes)
    10:08 am

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